In the realm of homesteading and preparedness planning, farm animals play a pivotal role that extends beyond their traditional agricultural contributions. Integrating livestock into your homestead not only ensures a sustainable source of fresh, wholesome produce but also enhances your overall self-sufficiency and resilience in times of crisis. Farm animals, such as chickens, goats, and pigs, provide a renewable and diversified food supply, yielding eggs, milk, meat, and more.
 
Their natural behaviors contribute to soil fertility through grazing and waste decomposition, fostering a healthier environment for crops. Moreover, the byproducts of farm animals, like manure, can be utilized for organic fertilization, reducing the reliance on synthetic alternatives.

In the context of preparedness, these animals act as living insurance, safeguarding against unforeseen disruptions to the food supply chain. Their presence ensures a consistent and reliable source of nourishment even during emergencies, mitigating the impact of potential shortages. Additionally, the skills acquired in raising and caring for farm animals empower homesteaders with valuable knowledge, enabling them to adapt to changing circumstances. From cultivating a self-sustaining ecosystem to developing a barter system with surplus products, farm animals contribute to a holistic approach to preparedness.

Embrace the harmony of nature and technology as you embark on a journey towards a more resilient and self-reliant homestead lifestyle.

Back in March ’13 we became quite the little farm.
We picked up 2 pigs, 1 pregnant goat, 1 goat with twin boys, 2 Cayuga ducks, and a couple of more chickens.

That summer was a summer of learning. We were blessed to be able to go on vacation and pay our neighbor to care for the animals.

Loss on the Farm

  • We lost 2 chickens to predators
  • We lost the ducks to predators
  • We butchered the older set of boy goats
  • We butchered the pigs

What we learned

  • Even when you KNOW you are getting those goats to eventually put in the freezer it will still be hard
  • Pigs are easier
  • You really like that you can pay the butcher to come out to the house
  • I like to watch my chickens
  • Goat can be noisy
  • Not all goat milk tastes the same

Final Thoughts

We got the animals to be more self sufficient.
It is going to be great to have our own pork in the freezer.
I have heard goat is yummy.
Better to learn now rather than later when works for us.
We also learned, from a security standpoint, goats probably won’t be a smart route. Or roosters 🙂
We have invested quite a bit in cattle panels, but now we have them.
We will probably do pigs again. Having them butchered wasn’t a problem mentally.
I think maybe rabbits for long term production, although you can’t live on rabbit alone.

What farm animals do you have?

5 Level of Preparedness
Acronyms
Apps
Bug Out or Bug In
Communications
Cooking
Dictionary
Family Plan
Farm Animals
First Aide
Food
Got Power
Got Shelter?
Kids or No Kids
Op Sec
Practice What You Preach~Power Outage Practice
Resources
Sanitation
Skills to Have
Tools
Urban vs Rural
Water

Another good read

Raising Chickens 101

 

https://i0.wp.com/mamakautz.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/farm-animlas-for-preparedness.png?fit=683%2C1024&ssl=1https://i0.wp.com/mamakautz.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/farm-animlas-for-preparedness.png?resize=150%2C150&ssl=1Mama Kautz31 Days of Emergency PreparednessHomesteadingPreppingPreppingIn the realm of homesteading and preparedness planning, farm animals play a pivotal role that extends beyond their traditional agricultural contributions. Integrating livestock into your homestead not only ensures a sustainable source of fresh, wholesome produce but also enhances your overall self-sufficiency and resilience in times of crisis. Farm...